Advice

Want To Buy a Gun In Lipstick? Tip 1

Photo by The U.S. National Archives

In this multi-part series, I will go into great detail about what I think a woman should know before, during, and after buying her first firearm. Over the next several weeks, I will share with you my tips and advice.

Of course, the unspoken tip is to wear lipstick, if you want to wear lipstick.

It’s intimidating to walk into a gun store, particularly if it is your first time. The good news is you can prepare. Here are some of my suggestions when you take that first step into a gun store. Ladies (and the men who love them) please sound off in the comments if you have other ideas on how to make the gun buying experience as pleasurable as trying on jeans at Macy’s. Ok. Maybe that was a bad analogy.

You’ve decided you want a gun. Or maybe you’ve decided to think about buying a gun. Or maybe you’ve started thinking it might be time for you to think about buying a gun. Regardless, I am here to help.

Tip 1: Take a Basic Course First

Most states don’t require this to purchase a firearm but they really should. Check out the Web sites of your local gun stores to see if they offer anything (you can also call and mouth talk to them but I get this is advanced communication and not everyone’s preferred first step). The National Rifle Association (NRA) also offers courses and a quick search shows they have them in most places in the country, including Manhattan (which shocked me). If you live somewhere remote or just cannot make it work, they offer their Basic Pistol Course online. While it in no way replaces actual classroom and practice time, it will help learn the basics of safety.

I strongly advocate taking a course. It’ll help you figure out if you really want to own a firearm, what kind, and will prepare you for the next steps. The number one rule of shooting is always Safety First. Taking classes not only makes you smarter and better informed, it makes you responsible. It is my belief that with the great power of being a firearms owner and shooter comes the great responsibility of being alert and safe at all times.

Take a class. You won’t regret it. If you can find one with instructor led practice sessions, even better. When you think you are ready to handle the responsibility of being a firearm owner, decide what type of gun you want.